We are now booking flu shot appointments-you can call our office today to book your child’s appointment!

For symptomatic Return to school/PCR Testing- go to link below-a Doctor script is not necessary for this site
https://www.ksldx.com/


Revised Covid-19 Information 7/2021

Revised Practice Updates
Covid-19 Pandemic safety protocols remain in place but have been scaled back to reflect the progress on combating the virus within the community thanks to widespread vaccinations.

All persons 2 years and up who enter the office must wear a face mask, regardless of vaccination status.

The waiting room is open, but patients should call first before entering.

Patients will continue to socially distance while inside.

Entry is limited to essential guests only.

Sick patients are using a separate entrance and are not congregating in the waiting room.

Non-urgent appointments are rescheduled if Covid-19 symptoms are present among the patient's household members.

Extended hours to 5pm will resume in September 2021.
General Covid-19 Information
**We are following the American Academy of Pediatrics guidelines (12/2020) to conduct in office cardiac screening for all children 5 years and older to determine risk of carditis and clearance to resume exercise/gym/sports.

We are vaccinating eligible aged patients for Covid-19 within the office.

Until vaccinated, continue to mask, social distance, and wash your hands frequently.

Do not send your child to daycare, camp, team sports nor school when ill nor if s/he has had close contact with someone who has or is under investigation for Covid-19. Proof of a negative test is required for us to write a note to return to above.

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Depression

Overview

Depression (major depressive disorder or clinical depression) is a common but serious mood disorder. It causes severe symptoms that affect how you feel, think, and handle daily activities, such as sleeping, eating, or working. To be diagnosed with depression, the symptoms must be present for at least two weeks.

Some forms of depression are slightly different, or they may develop under unique circumstances, such as:

  • Persistent depressive disorder (also called dysthymia) is a depressed mood that lasts for at least two years. A person diagnosed with persistent depressive disorder may have episodes of major depression along with periods of less severe symptoms, but symptoms must last for two years to be considered persistent depressive disorder.
  • Postpartum depression is much more serious than the “baby blues” (relatively mild depressive and anxiety symptoms that typically clear within two weeks after delivery) that many women experience after giving birth. Women with postpartum depression experience full-blown major depression during pregnancy or after delivery (postpartum depression). The feelings of extreme sadness, anxiety, and exhaustion that accompany postpartum depression may make it difficult for these new mothers to complete daily care activities for themselves and/or for their babies.
  • Psychotic depression occurs when a person has severe depression plus some form of psychosis, such as having disturbing false fixed beliefs (delusions) or hearing or seeing upsetting things that others cannot hear or see (hallucinations). The psychotic symptoms typically have a depressive “theme,” such as delusions of guilt, poverty, or illness.
  • Seasonal affective disorder is characterized by the onset of depression during the winter months, when there is less natural sunlight. This depression generally lifts during spring and summer. Winter depression, typically accompanied by social withdrawal, increased sleep, and weight gain, predictably returns every year in seasonal affective disorder.
  • Bipolar disorder is different from depression, but it is included in this list is because someone with bipolar disorder experiences episodes of extremely low moods that meet the criteria for major depression (called “bipolar depression”). But a person with bipolar disorder also experiences extreme high – euphoric or irritable – moods called “mania” or a less severe form called “hypomania.”

Examples of other types of depressive disorders newly added to the diagnostic classification of DSM-5 include disruptive mood dysregulation disorder (diagnosed in children and adolescents) and premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD).

Read more information here at NIMH.

 

Transit Office Hours

4899 Transit Road Depew, NY 14043

Monday – Friday: 8am-4pm
Saturday: 8am-12pm

(716) 558-5437