Coronavirus Pandemic Notice
Posted 7/4/20

Our Practice Updates General Covid-19 Updates
We are open for physicals and sick visits with safeguards in place to maintain proper social distancing within the office. Telehealth visits are available also, and they are covered by the insurance companies. As usual, we are available for advice 24/7.

All persons 2 years and up who enter the office must wear a face mask that covers both the mouth AND the nose.

We are seeing patients by appointment only.

We continue to have Saturday hours but not evening hours. M-Friday hours are 8-4pm.

To limit traffic in the office we request that only one adult accompany the child/children for the appointment(s). (Please do not bring extra children who do not have appointments.)

To maintain proper social distancing we have our patients using their vehicle as their own private waiting room until called to be escorted inside, one family at a time.

Well/Advance Rechecks are scheduled in the mornings and early afternoons while sick visits that cannot be managed by telehealth visits are scheduled in the late afternoons.

All patients are screened for:

  • symptoms of Covid-19 within 2 wks
  • travel to a Covid-19 “Hot Spot” within 2 wks.
  • a close contact:
    • with symptoms of Covid-19 within 2 wks.
    • who traveled to a Hot Spot within 2 wks.
    • under investigation for or quarantined for Covid-19 within 2 wks.
Appointments for well visits or advance rechecks are rescheduled if the screening above is positive.

We are not handling/exchanging forms nor payments within the office space. Please mail, fax, or send forms/papers through the patient portal.

Your family will be escorted out of the office one family at a time.

Employees are screened similarly prior to entering the office.

Our goal is to keep minor illness out of the office and urgent care centers, so please call for a Telehealth Visit.

We are not doing in-office testing for Covid-19.

The Center for Disease Control and the American Academy of Pediatrics endorse continued well visits to ensure that children stay up to date on their immunizations.

Refer to the Erie County Dept. of Health website for a list of Covid testing locations.

If you get tested, isolate as if you are positive until the results are reported as normal.

If there is a test-proven, positive Covid-19 case in your household refer to the Erie County Health Commissioner mandate (Health Alert Priority #355) for the proper quarantine procedure via this link: www.erie.gov/covid19.

The practice is not recommending Covid-19 antibody blood tests until more data is available on their accuracy and clinical usefulness.

Continue social distancing and good hand hygiene.

Do not send your child to daycare, camp, nor school with any symptoms of Covid-19 nor if he has had close contact with someone who has or is under investigation for Covid-19.

If you think your child has the Covid-19 virus he may be treated supportively at home. Regarding suspected Covid-19 illness, call if there is fever of 100.4 or higher longer than 72 hours or if there is shortness of breath, trouble breathing, or an extensive rash.

Everyone eligible for Flu shots should be vaccinated this season.


Just because we all are getting tired of the Pandemic, it doesn’t mean it’s over!
Everyone must do their part for the greater good.
If that is not inspiring enough, do it for your Nana and Papa!
Stay safe.
Thank You from the Providers and Staff of Genesee-Transit Pediatrics.

Eye - Pus or Discharge

Is this your child's symptom?

  • Yellow or green discharge (pus) in the eye
  • The eyelids are stuck (matted) together with pus after sleep
  • After being wiped away, the pus comes back during the day
  • Often caused by a bacterial eye infection

Causes of Eye with Pus

  • Bacterial Conjunctivitis. This is a bacterial infection of the eye. The main symptom is eyelids stuck together with pus after sleep. Can be present in 1 or both eyes. A few viruses can cause pus in the eyes, but most don't.
  • Viral Conjunctivitis. This is a viral infection of the eyes. Main symptom is pinkness of the white parts of the eyes. The eyes are also watery. Most often, there is no pus. Usually on both sides.
  • Normal Discharge. A small amount of dried mucus only in the corner of the eye. It may not even be pus. A collection of mucus can be cream colored. Often due to an irritant that got in the eye from dirty hands. Needs no treatment except wiping it away with warm water.
  • Blocked Tear Duct. Present in 10% of newborns. Main symptom is a constant watery eye. Tears fill the eye and run down the face. This happens even when not crying. The eye is not red and the eyelid is not swollen. The wet eye may get secondary infections. This will cause the eyelids to become matted with pus.
  • Foreign Object in Eye (Serious). Small particles such as sand, dirt or sawdust can be blown into the eyes. The grit often gets stuck under the upper eyelid. If not removed, the eye reacts by producing pus. The main clue is an eye infection that does not respond to antibiotic eyedrops. Older children complain of feeling something in the eye.
  • Eyelid Cellulitis (Serious). This is a deep infection of the eyelid and tissues around it. The main symptom is a red, swollen, very tender eyelid. The eye can be swollen shut. Usually only on one side. This can be a problem caused by bacterial conjunctivitis. The eye infection spreads inward. More commonly this is caused by an ethmoid sinus infection. That type occurs without any pus in the eye.

Symptoms of Bacterial Eye Infection

  • Yellow or green discharge or pus in the eye
  • Dried pus on the eyelids and eyelashes
  • The eyelashes are more likely to be stuck together after sleep
  • The whites of the eye may or may not be red or pink
  • The eyelids are often puffy

When to Call Us for Eye - Pus or Discharge

Call Doctor or Seek Care Now

  • Eyelid is very red or very swollen
  • Vision is blurred
  • Eye pain or discomfort is more than mild
  • Fever over 104° F (40° C)
  • Age less than 12 weeks old with fever. Caution: do NOT give your baby any fever medicine before being seen.
  • Your child looks or acts very sick
  • You think your child needs to be seen, and the problem is urgent

Contact Doctor Within 24 Hours

  • Pus in the eye, but none of the symptoms above. Reason: you may need antibiotic eyedrops to treat it.
  • Using antibiotic eye drops more than 3 days and pus is still there

Care Advice for Pus In the Eye

  1. What You Should Know About Bacterial Eye Infections:
    • Bacterial eye infections are common with colds.
    • They respond to home treatment with antibiotic eye drops which need a prescription.
    • They are not harmful to vision.
    • Until you get some antibiotic eye drops, here is some advice that should help.
  2. Remove Pus:
    • Remove all the dried and liquid pus from the eyelids. Use warm water and wet cotton balls to do this.
    • Do this whenever pus is seen on the eyelids.
    • Also, remove the pus before the antibiotic eye drops are put in. Reason: They will not work if you don't.
    • The pus can spread infection to others. So, dispose of it carefully.
    • Wash your hands well after any contact with the pus.
  3. Antibiotic Eye Drops: How to Use
    • For a cooperative child, gently pull down on the lower lid. Put 1 drop inside the lower lid. Then ask your child to close the eye for 2 minutes. Reason: So the medicine will get into the tissues.
    • For a child who won't open his eye, have him lie down. Put 1 drop over the inner corner of the eye. If your child opens the eye or blinks, the eye drop will flow in. If he doesn't open the eye, the drop will slowly seep into the eye.
  4. Contact Lenses:
    • Children who wear contact lenses need to switch to glasses until the infection is gone.
    • Reason: To prevent damage to the cornea.
    • Disinfect the contacts before wearing them again.
    • Discard them if they are disposable.
  5. Return to School:
    • Your child can return to school when the pus is a small amount.
    • Antibiotic eye drops should be used for 24 hours before going back.
    • The antibiotic eye drops can be used for other family members. Use only if they develop the same symptoms.
  6. What to Expect:
    • With treatment, the yellow discharge should clear up in 3 days.
    • The red eyes may last up to a week.
  7. Call Your Doctor If:
    • Eyelid gets red or swollen
    • You think your child needs to be seen
    • Your child becomes worse

And remember, contact your doctor if your child develops any of the 'Call Your Doctor' symptoms.

Disclaimer: this health information is for educational purposes only. You, the reader, assume full responsibility for how you choose to use it.

Copyright 2000-2020 Schmitt Pediatric Guidelines LLC.

 

Transit Office Hours

4899 Transit Road Depew, NY 14043

Monday thru Thursday: 8am-7pm
Fri: 8am-4pm
Sat: 8am-12pm

(716) 558-5437