Coronavirus Pandemic Notice
Posted 7/4/20

Our Practice Updates General Covid-19 Updates
We are open for physicals and sick visits with safeguards in place to maintain proper social distancing within the office. Telehealth visits are available also, and they are covered by the insurance companies. As usual, we are available for advice 24/7.

All persons 2 years and up who enter the office must wear a face mask that covers both the mouth AND the nose.

We are seeing patients by appointment only.

We continue to have Saturday hours but not evening hours. M-Friday hours are 8-4pm.

To limit traffic in the office we request that only one adult accompany the child/children for the appointment(s). (Please do not bring extra children who do not have appointments.)

To maintain proper social distancing we have our patients using their vehicle as their own private waiting room until called to be escorted inside, one family at a time.

Well/Advance Rechecks are scheduled in the mornings and early afternoons while sick visits that cannot be managed by telehealth visits are scheduled in the late afternoons.

All patients are screened for:

  • symptoms of Covid-19 within 2 wks
  • travel to a Covid-19 “Hot Spot” within 2 wks.
  • a close contact:
    • with symptoms of Covid-19 within 2 wks.
    • who traveled to a Hot Spot within 2 wks.
    • under investigation for or quarantined for Covid-19 within 2 wks.
Appointments for well visits or advance rechecks are rescheduled if the screening above is positive.

We are not handling/exchanging forms nor payments within the office space. Please mail, fax, or send forms/papers through the patient portal.

Your family will be escorted out of the office one family at a time.

Employees are screened similarly prior to entering the office.

Our goal is to keep minor illness out of the office and urgent care centers, so please call for a Telehealth Visit.

We are not doing in-office testing for Covid-19.

The Center for Disease Control and the American Academy of Pediatrics endorse continued well visits to ensure that children stay up to date on their immunizations.

Refer to the Erie County Dept. of Health website for a list of Covid testing locations.

If you get tested, isolate as if you are positive until the results are reported as normal.

If there is a test-proven, positive Covid-19 case in your household refer to the Erie County Health Commissioner mandate (Health Alert Priority #355) for the proper quarantine procedure via this link: www.erie.gov/covid19.

The practice is not recommending Covid-19 antibody blood tests until more data is available on their accuracy and clinical usefulness.

Continue social distancing and good hand hygiene.

Do not send your child to daycare, camp, nor school with any symptoms of Covid-19 nor if he has had close contact with someone who has or is under investigation for Covid-19.

If you think your child has the Covid-19 virus he may be treated supportively at home. Regarding suspected Covid-19 illness, call if there is fever of 100.4 or higher longer than 72 hours or if there is shortness of breath, trouble breathing, or an extensive rash.

Everyone eligible for Flu shots should be vaccinated this season.


Just because we all are getting tired of the Pandemic, it doesn’t mean it’s over!
Everyone must do their part for the greater good.
If that is not inspiring enough, do it for your Nana and Papa!
Stay safe.
Thank You from the Providers and Staff of Genesee-Transit Pediatrics.

­

Colic

Reviewed 6/24/2011
By Daniel Feiten MD
Greenwood Pediatrics

Colic can be one of the major stresses in child rearing. The colicky infant usually cries for at least several hours a day, more often in the late afternoon and early evening hours. It begins in the first few weeks of life, peaks in the fourth to sixth week, and then typically resolves by the third or fourth month of life. Your child may display sudden and intense crying which is accompanied by stiffening, drawing up of the legs, and passing of gas.

Cause

The cause of colic is unknown. Although many people assume that it is a result of intestinal pain, the cause seems to vary with each infant. Air swallowing, immaturity of the intestinal tract, immaturity of the nervous system, a hypersensitivity to a protein in cow's milk, a sensitivity to environmental stimuli, and low progesterone have all been suggested as possible factors.

What to do about Colic

Don't Blame Yourself. It is natural to become frustrated and angry over a child who won't stop crying. Some parents will begin to question their parenting skills, thinking that " I must be doing something wrong !" Try to relax. Fortunately, colic usually resolves by itself over time.

Never Shake your Baby! Anxiety and frustration have led parents to shake their baby in an attempt to make them stop crying. Shaking can lead to bleeding in the brain and it must be avoided at all times! Call us immediately if you have just shaken your newborn or if you feel the urge to harm your infant.

Feed your Baby Calmly. Feedings should be quiet and not hurried. Handle your baby gently. Avoid distractions by discouraging telephone calls and well-meaning visitors, especially during the peak periods of colic.

Try a Variety of Calming Methods. Each baby responds to these methods differently. Try to find the right one for your child: gently rocking or walking, swaddling, "shooshing", an infant swing, soft music, "white noise" from the TV/radio, taped uterine sounds, auto rides, and pacifiers. A child carrier (eg. "Snuggly") has been shown to be of benefit when used consistently. Try bathing your baby or simply undressing her. Some parents have found success with putting their child in a car seat and putting it on top of the dryer when it is running. (Be sure to hold on !)

Minimize Air Swallowing. Use frequent burping and proper bottle position. If your baby is bottle-fed, make sure that the hole in the nipple is big enough. If your baby tends to pass a lot of gas, you may try Mylicon drops, an over-the-counter remedy which is harmless.

Avoid Cows Milk. A few studies have shown that a small percentage of infants are sensitive to a protein found in cow's milk.If you are bottle feeding, try changing from a cow's milk -based formula to a soy-based formula or a lactose-free formula. For nursing mothers, it may be necessary to avoid all milk products for one week to see if your child's colic diminishes. Some doctors will also recommend avoidance of other types of food such as chocolate, spicy foods, and "gassy vegetables" like cucumbers and broccoli. If these don't help, call us during office hours to consider further formula changes.

Plan Ahead. If your child is fussy during dinner time, prepare the meal earlier in the day so that you can devote all of your time to your baby. Housework may have to wait.

Take a Break. Many people feel reluctant and guilty about giving their child to another to take care of. Spouses, partners, friends and relatives can each take their turn with a colicky child. Don't try to do it alone!

Consider Probiotics A recent study in Italy evaluated 50 babies with colic...some were given Lactobacillus Reuteri while others received a placebo. The infants who received the probiotic had a significant reduction in crying. This study needs to be repeated in other centers. Keep in mind that the FDA does not regulate OTC probiotics and so the quantity of bacteria may vary among OTC products.


 

Transit Office Hours

4899 Transit Road Depew, NY 14043

Monday thru Thursday: 8am-7pm
Fri: 8am-4pm
Sat: 8am-12pm

(716) 558-5437