Coronavirus Pandemic Notice
Posted 2/3/2021

Our Practice Updates General Covid-19 Information
The Coronavirus Pandemic safety protocols remain in place.

All persons 2 years and up who enter the office must wear a face mask that covers both the mouth AND the nose.

To maintain proper social distancing within the office, we continue to call you in from your car and to escort you out one family at a time.

Therefore, entering and exiting transitions take longer. Please be patient with us as we do our best to keep everyone as safe as possible.

Only one adult may accompany the patient(s) for the appointment(s) to limit in office capacity.

We continue to separate, by session, appointments for well/non-sick patients from appointments for sick/contagions concerns.

All entrants are screened for Covid-19 symptoms and exposure. (All non-urgent appointments are rescheduled if there is a positive screen.)

Our pandemic hours are the still Monday-Friday 8am-4pm and we continue to have Saturday hours 8am-12pm.

As usual, we are available for advice 24/7.

Telehealth visits are still available.

The office is not handling cash payments within the office space.

We are not doing in-office testing for Covid-19.

We are not yet offering Coronavirus vaccines.

**We are following the American Academy of Pediatrics guidelines (12/2020) to conduct in office cardiac screening for all children 5 years and older in order to determine clearance to resume exercise/gym/sports.


Continue to mask, social distance, and wash your hands frequently.

Avoid unnecessary gatherings with persons with whom you do not live.

Do not send your child to daycare, camp, nor school with any symptoms of Covid-19 nor if he has had close contact with someone who has or is under investigation for Covid-19.

Refer to the Erie County Dept. of Health website for a list of Covid testing locations.

If you get tested, isolate as if you are positive and quarantine your family until the results are reported as normal.

If there is a test-proven, positive Covid-19 case in your household refer to the Erie County Health Commissioner mandate (Health Alert Priority #355) for the proper quarantine procedure via this link: www.erie.gov/covid19. Note the quarantine time has been shortened from 14 to 10 days.

If you think your child has the Covid-19 virus he may be treated supportively at home. Regarding suspected Covid-19 illness, call if there is fever of 100.4 or higher longer than 72 hours or if there is shortness of breath, trouble breathing, difficulty keeping down fluids, or an extensive rash.

Presently available vaccines are approved for either 16 or 18 year-olds and up.


Stay safe!
Let’s Go Buffalo!
Crush this Virus!

­

Sleeping

By Daniel Feiten MD

 

References

http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/early/2011/10/12/peds.2011-2284

Newborns sleep a lot during the first month of life. Your child may sleep anywhere from 12 to 20 hours per day with an average of 16 hours per day. The duration of this sleep is variable, from 15 minutes to 5 or 6 hours.

Most newborns awaken 1 to 3 times during the night in the first 3 months of life and the majority of infants can be expected to sleep through the night by 4 to 6 months of age. Many parents (and grandparents!) assume that these nighttime awakenings are related to their infant's need to eat. This may be part of the problem in the first 2 months, but there is much more to it.

Infants awaken several times during the night because they have an immature sleeping pattern. Two general patterns exist:

  • REM Sleep: This is an "active sleep" pattern in which babies display a lot of movement, restlessness, twitching, irregular breathing and brief awakenings. Infants may go through this pattern 2 - 4 times a night, resulting in a nighttime awakening at the end of each REM sleep pattern. Newborns have this pattern during 50% of their sleeping time (adults have 25%). No wonder babies wake up so much at night! Fortunately, this pattern decreases by age 3 - 4 months, allowing most children (and parents) to sleep through the night.
  • NON-REM Sleep: A "Quiet Sleep" pattern in which infants display less movement, a regular breathing pattern, and a deeper sleep in which it seems to be very difficult to awaken your baby.

Although most children learn to sleep through the night on their own, here are a few tips to follow to try to avoid future sleep problems:

Before 4 Months:

  1. Keep 'em Cozy. Your newborn has been used to 9 months of close quarters while she was growing inside you. Keep her comfortable by swaddling her, using a small bassinet or crib, and keeping the room at about 68° to 72°F. Caution: don't over bundle, and don't use sheepskins, waterbeds or down comforters because of the risk of suffocation.
  2. Put your baby in the crib while awake. Let your baby learn to fall asleep without you. Crying for 15 to 20 minutes is not unusual. If necessary, rock her, but put her in the crib before she falls asleep. Background noise may also help to signal nap times or bed time. Try a radio, air conditioner, a musical toy, tapes of uterine sounds, or the white noise that comes from an unoccupied TV channel or radio frequency. Try to wean the use of noises by 4 months of age.
  3. Establish a routine. A consistent daytime and nighttime ritual for naps and bedtime is extremely important. If your hectic schedule does not permit this, try to always be home for the same nap time every day.
  4. Hold your baby for fussy crying. Children under 4 months need to be soothed. Respond to your baby. You will not spoil her.
  5. Be brief during nighttime feedings. Save the fun stuff (singing, playing etc.) for the daytime.
  6. Don't awaken your child during the night to change diapers. Wet diapers can be left until the morning, unless your child has a severe diaper rash.

Preventing Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS):  

The American Academy of Pediatrics has reviewed the factors that prevent (or lead to) Sudden Infant Death Syndrome. Please be mindful of the following recommendations:

  1.   Put your infant to sleep on her back.
  2.   Share your room with her....but do not share your bed. This can reduce the risk of SIDS by up to 50%.
  3.   Keep toys, stuffed animals, bumper pads and loose bedding out of the crib.
  4.   Use a firm mattress that conforms to the safety standards of the Consumer Product Safety Commission
  5.   Consider offering a pacifier to your infant under 4 months at naps and bedtime. You do not need to re-insert the pacifier if it falls out and your chlld is sleeping well. 
  6.   Avoid smoke exposure, alcohol and illicit drug use during your pregnancy and after birth.
  7.   Avoid overheating your baby. Keep the room temperature between 68 - 72 degrees.
  8.   Breastfeeding is recommended.
  9.   Avoid the use of commercial products that are marketed as a product to reduce SIDS. Bed Co-sleepers should be avoided.
  10.   Supervise all tummy time while your baby is awake.


 


 

Transit Office Hours

4899 Transit Road Depew, NY 14043

Monday – Friday: 8am-4pm
Saturday: 8am-12pm

(716) 558-5437